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When President Benjamin Harrison signed the law admitting Idaho as a state on July 3, 1890, the population was 88,548 – a little more than 5 percent of the current count.
A new series of free lectures at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library will examine the history of the area that would become Idaho 125 years ago.
“Idaho 125: Wilderness to Statehood,” will be presented by regional historian Robert Singletary, Director of the Programs and Marketing for the Museum of North Idaho, with “Native Cultures,” on Thursday, Feb. 26.
All programs in the 10-part series will begin at 7 p.m. in the Community Room at the Library, 702 E. Front Ave.
Subsequent programs will be “Lewis and Clark,” March 26; “Fur Trade,” April 23; “Missions,” May 28, “Trails and Roads,” June 25; “Gold and Silver,” July 23; “Indian Wars,” Aug. 27; “Railroads,” Sept. 24; “Settlements and Towns,” Oct. 22; and “Statehood,” Nov. 12.
The program is presented in partnership with the Museum of North Idaho, 115 Northwest Blvd., open April 1 to Oct. 31.
The series is also supported by the Friends of the Library.

Patrons who need accommodation to particiate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

The 27th annual contest to find great writers in our community has begun at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
The Writers Competition is for fiction and nonfiction prose – no poetry please – up to 2,000 words. Entry forms, rules and a guide to creating an entry are available by visiting the library, by e-mail request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , or by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Writers Competition, Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave., Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814-4012.
The deadline for entries is March 31. Each competitor may submit up to two entries in whatever combination of fiction and/or nonfiction they choose.
Entries will be judged in age groups 6-8, 9-11, 12-14, 15-18, and 19-plus by professional writers, editors, and educators. Winning entries will receive cash awards in each category and age group, $100 for first, $50 for second, and $25 for third. Professionally bound volumes containing all entries in the competition will be placed in the library collection.
Winners will be notified by phone and e-mail and will be announced publicly at the Awards Ceremony on Saturday, May 16, at 1 p.m. in the library Community Room.
Information: David Townsend, communications coordinator, 208-769-2315 Ext. 426 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

The Pageturners Library Book Club at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library will start the new year discussing biographies and autobiographies as part of the Let’s Talk About It (LTAI) program.
Book discussions to be offered January through May at the library the fourth Wednesday of each month at 10:15 a.m. will use books provided by the Idaho Commission for Libraries. Scholars to lead the discussions are provided by the Idaho Humanities Council. Additional support is provided by the US Bancorp Foundation and the Institute of Museums and Library Services.
Local support is provided by the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
Book club discussions are free and open to any adult reader. Books and discussion materials will be available to check out at the library’s Research and Information Desk. Discussions are held in the Community Room. (The group does not meet during December.)
Dates, titles, and discussion leaders include:
► Jan. 28: “Bloodlines” by Janet Campbell Hale, a collection of autobiographical essays reflecting on her youth as a member of a poor, troubled Indian family. Discussion leader: Ron McFarland.
► Feb. 25: “Growing Up” by Russell Baker, the journalist’s real-life story demonstrates that despite hardships, the American Dream is actually possible. Discussion leader: Nancy Casey
March 25: “Hole in the Sky” by William Kittredge, who grew up on his family’s farm in southeastern Oregon where he felt a deep connection to the land and the cowboys who worked it. Discussion leader: Ron McFarland.
► April 22: “In the Wilderness” by Kim Barnes, a memoir about growing up in the isolated logging camps of North Idaho in the 1960s. Discussion leader: David Barber.
► May 27: “Refuge” by Terry Tempest Williams, an autobiographical account which chronicles a disruptive period in Williams’ life.
Information: 208-769-2315 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

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