Beginning June 12, Lake City Public Library, in the high school on Ramsey Road, will have extended hours - Monday through Thursday, noon to 5 p.m.
June 1 to Aug. 31 LCPL will have its own Summer Reading program with reading logs for children and teens.
Weekly activities include:
► Storytime: For all ages, Wednesdays, 12:30-1 p.m. Includes a snack.
► LEGO Club With Robots: Thursdays, 4-5 p.m.

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-763-0814.

It’s time to get the book, read it, and plan to join the discussion.
“Reading for The Library,” a benefit for the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, will feature regional author Emily Ruskovich, discussing her novel, “Idaho,” Sunday, Nov. 19. The doors will open at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets are $20 per person, and include a soup dinner – provided by Soul Soup – bread, desserts, and beverages. Tickets are available online at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3100699.
The evening is being underwritten by the Columbia Bank, Pita Pit, and the Coeur d’Alene Dental Center.
“Idaho” is the first novel for Ruskovich, who grew up in North Idaho on Hoodoo Mountain. Her fiction has appeared in Zoetrope, One Story, and The Virginia Quarterly Review.
Ruskovich was the winner of a 2015 O. Henry Award and a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She currently teaches creative writing at Boise State University and lives in Idaho City.
In the novel, Ann and Wade have carved out a life for themselves from a rugged landscape in North Idaho, where they are bound together by more than love. With her husband’s memory fading, Ann attempts to piece together the truth of what happened to Wade's first wife and to their daughters.
In a story told from multiple perspectives—including Ann, Wade, and Wade’s first wife Jenny, now serving a life sentence in prison — we gradually learn of the mysterious and shocking act that fractured Wade and Jenny's lives, of the love and compassion that brought Ann and Wade together, and of the memories that reverberate through the lives of every character in “Idaho.”
Information: Coeur d’Alene Public Library Foundation, 208-769-2315 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

The library will have a late opening on Friday, Oct. 20, in order to conduct in-service training for the staff.
The library will be open from 12 to 6 p.m.
When the library is closed many services are still available at www.cdalibrary.org. Patrons can access their library records, place holds, use online resources, and download music and e-books. Most of these resources require a user name and password. Obtain these by calling or visiting the library during open hours.

Educators and other interested adults are invited to a special screening of The Ken Burns’ documentary on the Vietnam War at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library on Monday, Oct. 23 at 7 p.m. with staff from Idaho Public Television.
“A Vietnam Dialogue: Ken Burns for Educators” will include the screening followed by a discussion and a review of the free educational resources available for teachers from PBS.
Local Vietnam veterans will take part in the conversation.
The 63-minute compilation melds pieces of the longer 18-hour documentary into an intense and evocative overview of the entire series, which first began airing Sept. 17. The documentary, by Burns and Lynn Novick, took 10 years to complete and examines the Vietnam War conflict from all sides, including both the North and South Vietnamese viewpoints.
It utilizes graphic footage and photos from the war which may be disturbing to some viewers. In light of this, the free public event is not recommended for children.
Direct U.S. military involvement ended on Aug. 15, 1973. The fall of Saigon in April 1975 marked the end of the war.
The war exacted a huge human cost in terms of fatalities. Estimates of the number of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians killed vary from 966,000 to 3.8 million. Some 240,000–300,000 Cambodians, 20,000–62,000 Laotians, and 58,220 U.S. service members also died in the conflict, and a further 1,626 Americans remain missing in action.

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

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