Winners in the 29th annual Writers Competition at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library received recognition Saturday, May 20, in a ceremony hosted by the Friends of the Library.
Cash prizes for the competition are made possible through grants provided by the Coeur d’Alene Kiwanis Club with additional support provided by the Friends.
Entries are judged by professional writers, editors, published authors, and educators.
The Writers Competition was created by former Library Director Julie Meier in 1988 to encourage excellence in writing and reveal authors in our community.
Winners receive $100 for first place, $50 for second place, and $25 for third place. In the case of ties duplicate full prizes are awarded. In addition, all entries in the competition are included in professionally bound books added to the library’s reference collection.
Winners for 2017 and their entries included:
Nonfiction 6-8 (Two Entries): First, Lydia Ruth Kirkbride, Coeur d’Alene, “All About Phil Weidner” - Second , John Paul Hersey, Coeur d’Alene, “The Bad Horses.”
Nonfiction 9-11: First, Adison Harrison, Coeur d’Alene, “The Adoption” – Second, Tyler Hamblin, Hayden, “The Battle of Vicksburg” – Third, Preston Chapman, Blanchard, “Glory and Fame Never Forgotten.”
Nonfiction 12-14: First, Megan White, Coeur d’Alene, “The Thoughts of Skeletons” – Second, Bryce Koontz, Liberty Lake, Wash., “The Day My Heart Was Stolen” – Third, Alyson S. Ward, Post Falls, “My Love for Animals.”
Nonfiction 15-18: First, Hannah Patin, Hayden, “Ready … Set … Row!” - Second, Annie Cuentas, Post Falls, “Swinging Through the Seasons” – Third, Alahna Harrison, Coeur d’Alene, “Legacy.”
Nonfiction 19+: First, Rebecca Crouse, Rathdrum, “One More Day” - Second-tie, Brenda Bergelin, Coeur d’Alene, “A Requiem for Ragnar” - Second-tie, Victoria Collins, Coeur d’Alene, “When Writers Meet” – Third, Sherry Groeschl, Rathdrum, “Mr. King.”
Fiction 6-8: First, Brandon Goold, Coeur d’Alene, “Toad, the Toad” – Second, McKenna Crouse, Rathdrum, “Not Hawaii” – Third, Jossy Johnson, Coeur d’Alene, “The Quest.”
Fiction 9-11: First, Hattie Mei Owens, Coeur d’Alene, “Karate Cat” – Second, Annika Baltzell, Coeur d’Alene, “A Mission” – Third, Kaylee Tedder, Post Falls, “The Amazing Daring Derik.”
Fiction 12-14: First, Cassidy Olsen, Post Falls, “The Third Floor Window” – Second, Hayley Patin, Hayden, “Ursula: Good or Bad” – Third, Logan Graham, Hayden, “Idaho Graham and the Texts of Immortality.”
Fiction 15-18: First, Mikaela Funderburg, Coeur d’Alene, “The Left-Hand Side of the Page” – Second, Jessica Gates, Hayden, “Firebird’s Plume” – Third, Jackson Graham, Hayden, “By Delusion Enfolded.”
Fiction 19+: First, Glenn Graham, Harrison, “QA2-876” – Second, Rebecca Crouse, Rathdrum, “Around the World in Four Minutes” – Third, Angela J. Chandler, Harrison, “Recherchez Amour.”

Pictured: Front row, left to right, Lydia Kirkbride, John Hersey, Brandon Goold, McKenna Crouse, and Jossy Johnson. Second row, Adison Harrison, Tyler Hamblin, Preston Chapman, Kaylee Tedder, Annika Baltzell, and Hattie Mei Owens. Megan White, Bryce Koontz, Alyson Ward, Cassidy Olsen, Hayley Patin, Logan Graham, and Jessica Gates. Back row, Alahna Harrison, Mikaela Funderburg, Rebecca Crouse, Victoria Collins, Sherry Groeschl, and Angela Chandler. Not pictured Hanna Patin, Annie Cuentas, Brenda Bergelin, Jackson Graham, and Glenn Graham.

The role of the military in North Idaho – from the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Farragut Naval Training Station – will be the next subject for the Inland Northwest Milestones history series at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library Thursday, May 25 at 7 p.m.
The free series is offered in partnership with the Museum of North Idaho and is presented by the museum’s Director of Programming and Marketing, regional historian Robert Singletary.
It is often overlooked that the Corps of Discovery, under the command of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, was structured and operated as a military unit. Other military influences on the region included the creation of the Mullan Road, designed to link army posts, created under the command of Capt. John Mullan, and the establishment of Fort Sherman, which in many ways led to the development of the community of Coeur d’Alene.
During WWII the Farragut facility on the banks of Lake Pend Oreille at Bayview saw to the training of thousands of sailors and gave North Idaho a major economic boost. Even today, Bayview is the site of a U.S. Navy facility for testing submarine designs.
The featured exhibit for the 2017 season at the Museum of North Idaho, “The Military and Community,” also examines the subject. Located at 115 Northwest Blvd., in front of the City Park, the museum is open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Oct. 31. The museum library and office are open by appointment year round.
The Milestones series is offered in the Community Room, usually on the fourth Thursday of each month, except for the final program which will be presented on Nov. 30 due to the Thanksgiving holiday.
Upcoming programs in the series will be:
► June 22: Farragut College and Technical Institute.
► July 27: Coeur d’Alene Regattas.
► Aug. 24: Farming in North Idaho.
► Sept. 28: Inland Empire Electric Line.
► Oct. 26: Kirtland Cutter: Spokane’s Master Architect.
► Nov. 30: History of Skiing in North Idaho.

Photo: The entrance to Fort Sherman with the post hospital in the background about 1890. Photo courtesy of the Museum of North Idaho archives.

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

“Dare to Be,” a documentary, will be screened at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library on Wednesday, May 24, at 6 p.m., in the Community Room in partnership with the Coeur d’Alene Rowing Association.
The movie is free and refreshments are provided.
Produced and directed by Adam Reist, the film includes three stories following the lives of rowers from their earliest learning experiences, through high school and college, and to the 2012 Summer Olympics.
Rowing as a competitive sport began in Coeur d’Alene in the early 20th Century. The sport was reintroduced in the mid-1980s as a community rowing program established at North Idaho College. Several faculty members, including English professor Jim MacLeod, were the organizers. Rod Mott, now head coach at Vassar College, was the first coach of the student division of the club and Peter Wagstaff coached the masters, a group of experienced and novice rowers in the community.
The association has rowing facilities at the west end of Fernan Lake. Membership and other information is available at the group’s website: www.cdarowing.org

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

A nonfiction option has been added to the preloaded Kindles available for check out at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
In December the library added Kindles loaded with high-demand fiction and now has thre of the simple black and white devices that patrons can place holds on like printed books.
A fourth Kindle has been loaded with nonfiction books that library records indicate patrons have placed on hold numerous times.
The available nonfiction titles on the device include: “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City” by Matthew Desmond, “Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race” by Margot Lee Shetterly, “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis”  by J.D. Vance, “Love Warrior: A Memoir” by Glennon Doyle Melton, and “The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds” by Michael Lewis.
For now, the Kindle eReaders will be available to check out from the Research and Information Desk for up to 28 days. If demand increases, the loan period may be shortened.
The devices are not equipped with browsers – such as Chrome or Explorer – but are just set up to read the books loaded on them. The devices can be found on the library’s catalog as “High Demand Nonfiction (Coeur d’Alene) Kindle eReader.”
The Kindles can also be used by readers who need large-print materials. The fonts can be enlarged by readers for easier viewing.
Information on the new service is available at 208-769-2315 or by visiting the Research and Information Desk at the library, 702 E. Front Ave.

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