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What state contains the highest waterfall, the deepest canyon, the longest whitewater river miles, and most wilderness per capita in the lower 48 states? Most people don’t know.
“Destination Idaho,” a new film by producer Karen Day, will answer those questions when it is screened Thursday, July 7, at 7 p.m., at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
Admission is free.
The film is a visual journey that will inform and inspire audiences to value and visit the great Gem State by presenting the best things people don’t know about Idaho. This 65-minute documentary invites viewers to experience stunning landscapes, rich historical backgrounds, unparalleled outdoor recreation, compelling people, and cultural assets a 2,000-mile road trip via Airstream to the state's most interesting and unknown assets
Presented with engaging personal interviews and historical footnotes, “Destination Idaho” offers a never-before-seen, "family-friendly" picture of the Gem State beyond stereotypes and lovely landscapes. North to south, east to west this film shows why Idaho and Idahoans are unique among all others. The original soundtrack is even comprised of Idaho musicians.
Filmed over the past two years, this film is an unusual “commercial hybrid,” created in partnership with award-winning Idaho filmmaker, Day, and a host of public and private partners, large and small, including the Idaho State Historical Society, Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, Idaho Tourism, U.S. National Parks Service, Airstream Adventures Northwest, Boise Convention & Visitors Bureau, Sun Valley Resort, Shore Lodge and many more.
“Destination Idaho” premiered at the 2016 Sun Valley Film Festival (SVFF) with standing room only. The movie will also screen July 6 at Sandpoint’s Panida Theater. As the film travels to several venues throughout the state Day is traveling in a customized Airstream with special “Destination Idaho” signage.
“Because I Can,” a three-minute short on Kristin Armstrong will screen before the main feature.
“Because I Can” was produced and directed by Day just back from winning “Best Short Film in 10 Brands Competition for Google at Geena Davis's Bentonville Film Festival.
This short is part of feature-length documentary (currently in production) on Idaho's two-time cycling gold medalist. Armstrong, 42, is racing for an historic third gold medal in Rio 2016. This Idaho mom is fighting the odds to make Olympic history, busting age and gender barriers on her way to the podium.
Karen Day has produced 14 documentaries. Her previous film, “Girl From God’s Country,” about silent film era filmmaker Nell Shipman, had its world premiere at the 2015 SVFF and went on to win Best Documentary at the Cannes Independent Artisan Film Festival, with international distribution through Arc Entertainment and Women Make Movies. Day has premiered documentaries at four of five SVFFs.
Idaho’s Department of Parks and Recreation manages 30 state parks and recreation areas throughout Idaho.  The mission of the agency is to improve the quality of life in Idaho through outdoor recreation and resource stewardship. Learn more about Idaho’s State Parks and Recreation Programs by visiting: www.parksandrecreation.idaho.gov.
 
Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

The Lake City Public Library (LCPL) – housed at Lake City High School – will have extended summer hours beginning June 13.
Hours will be Mondays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Tuesdays, 1-5 p.m.; and Thursdays, 1-7 p.m.
Located within the school library at 6101 Ramsey Rd., LCPL has its own collection of books, computers for public use, and public WiFi. The branch can be designated to receive items placed on hold from any library in the Cooperative Information Network.
According to Branch Manager JD Smithson the library will offer Summer Reading programs to be announced later. She noted that due to school district maintenance the branch will be closed Aug. 1-12.
The phone number at LCPL is 208-763-0814, its website is www.lcplibrary.org; and its e-mail is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

Entry forms are now available for the Fan Art Contest for Coeur d’Con – the library comic con at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library on Aug. 13.
Artists are invited to submit original work or to select a graphic novel, movie, or video game to depict. Entry forms can be picked up at any of the public desks at the library, 702 E. Front Ave, and at Lake City Public Library, 6101 N. Ramsey Road. The forms will also be made downloadable from www.coeurdcon.wordpress.com.
All pieces must be brought to the main library by closing time on Friday, July 29, to be considered for the public display.
Entries will be displayed at the library leading up to and during Coeur d’Con and will be judged by the public.
Information: 208-769-2315 or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

 

“Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863, and the March on Washington, 1963,” a traveling exhibition opening at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library on June 1 examines the relationship between two great people's movements that resulted in the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, and the March on Washington in 1963.
Both grew out of decades of bold actions, resistance, organization, and vision. One hundred years separate them, yet they are linked in a larger story of liberty and the American experience – one that has had a profound impact on the generations that followed. 
“Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863 and the March on Washington, 1963” is presented by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of American History in collaboration with the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The tour of the exhibition is made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.
The library will host an opening reception at 6 p.m., Friday, June 3, with a presentation by Tony Stewart and Norm Gissel examining the local struggle for civil rights.
The library’s local partner for this exhibition is the Human Rights Education Institute.
On Thursday, June 16, at 7 p.m. in the Community Room, the library will screen the PBS American Experience docudrama “The Abolitionist.” Coming June 30, beginning at 6 p.m. the library will screen the PBS American Experience documentary “Freedom Riders.” Following the film Stephen K. Shaw, professor of Political Science at Northwest Nazarene University and Dean of the School of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, will discuss the history of human rights in Idaho and lead the discussion about the film.
Shaw’s participation is made possible by a grant from the Idaho Humanities Council, the state based affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
The exhibit, on the main floor of the library, will be open to the public during regular library hours through July 15.
The library is also sponsoring a “Changing America Art Project.” Patrons are invited to create and submit art based on the theme, “Civil Rights, Civil Lives,” to be exhibited in the Parkside Gallery on the lower level at the library during July. Entry form for the project are available at the library.
The exhibition will have traveled travel to 50 venues across the nation, accompanied by public programming that will help audiences understand and discuss the relationship between these two great people’s movements.
The National Museum of African American History and Culture was established as a Smithsonian museum by an Act of Congress in 2003. It is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, art, history and culture. Groundbreaking for the $500 million museum took place in February 2013 in a ceremony featuring remarks by President Barack Obama; former First Lady Laura Bush, a member of the museum’s advisory council; and Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) who submitted the legislation that created the museum. For more information, visit www.nmaahc.si.edu.
The National Museum of American History collects, preserves and displays American heritage through exhibitions and public programs about social, political, cultural, scientific and military history. Documenting the American experience from Colonial times to the present, the museum looks at growth and change in the United States. For more information, visit www.americanhistory.si.edu.
Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities.  NEH grants enrich classroom learning, create and preserve knowledge and bring ideas to life through public television, radio, new technologies, exhibitions and programs in libraries, museums and other community places.  Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at www.neh.gov.

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

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