Happiness may be a warm puppy, but the Well-Knit Tale Knitting Club at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library wants to create something to keep that puppy warm.
Participants are knitting/crocheting blankets for the shelter animals at the Kootenai Humane Society during March.
Anyone is welcome to join the club Tuesdays, March 7 and 21, 2:30-4 p.m., in the Jameson Room to work on the blankets. All skill levels for knitting and crocheting welcome. Bring yarn, needles, patterns, and projects if you have them. Refreshments will be provided.
You can also knit/crochet blankets at home and then drop them off at the library.
The blankets will be given to the Humane Society and will go home with pets as they are adopted to provide something with which they are familiar
For more information, contact Mary at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

The events, developments, and people who have shaped the history of our region will be examined through a series of programs sponsored by the Museum of North Idaho and the Coeur d’Alene Public Library through November.
Historian Robert Singletary will present the next program in the “Inland Northwest Milestones” series Thursday, March 23, at 7 p.m. with information and images from Spokane’s Natatorium Park.
Natatorium Park began as a trolley park, one of many that sprung up across the country. These parks were often owned by the trolley lines, and were placed at the end of the tracks to give riders a reason to ride.
Initially named Twickenham Park after a housing development of the same name, the park's first attraction was a first-class baseball diamond that went into service on July 18, 1889. Soon after, a hotel and casino were added to create additional interest in the park beyond the sporting events that took place there.
The park also featured a beautifully landscaped garden and picnic grounds, along with a lily pond and an elaborate outdoor fountain in its setting on the bank of the Spokane River. More attractions were added over the years to keep interest in the park alive. Numerous zoo animals were brought in, top-name performers were brought in to entertain the crowds, the grounds were turned into a park setting, and amusement rides were added to the park. Reduced interest and smaller turnouts caused Natatorium to be closed for good after its 1967 season.
The free lecture series is offered in the Community Room, usually on the fourth Thursday of each month, except for the final program which will be presented on Nov. 30 due to the Thanksgiving holiday.
Singletary will step away from the lectern on April 27 when songwriter and storyteller Tracy Morrison will present “Idaho Women: Stories and Folksongs.” This program is made possible through the support of the Speakers Bureau at the Idaho Humanities Council, the state-based affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Local support is provided by the Friends of the Library.
Additional programs in the Milestones series will be:
May 25: The Military in North Idaho.
June 22: Farragut College and Technical Institute.
July 27: Coeur d’Alene Regattas.
Aug. 24: Farming in North Idaho.
Sept. 28: Inland Empire Electric Line.
Oct. 26: Kirtland Cutter: Spokane’s Master Architect.
Nov. 30: History of Skiing in North Idaho.

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

A nonfiction option has been added to the preloaded Kindles available for check out at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
In December the library added Kindles loaded with high-demand fiction and now has thre of the simple black and white devices that patrons can place holds on like printed books.
A fourth Kindle has been loaded with nonfiction books that library records indicate patrons have placed on hold numerous times.
The available nonfiction titles on the device include: “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City” by Matthew Desmond, “Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race” by Margot Lee Shetterly, “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis”  by J.D. Vance, “Love Warrior: A Memoir” by Glennon Doyle Melton, and “The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds” by Michael Lewis.
For now, the Kindle eReaders will be available to check out from the Research and Information Desk for up to 28 days. If demand increases, the loan period may be shortened.
The devices are not equipped with browsers – such as Chrome or Explorer – but are just set up to read the books loaded on them. The devices can be found on the library’s catalog as “High Demand Nonfiction (Coeur d’Alene) Kindle eReader.”
The Kindles can also be used by readers who need large-print materials. The fonts can be enlarged by readers for easier viewing.
Information on the new service is available at 208-769-2315 or by visiting the Research and Information Desk at the library, 702 E. Front Ave.

The 28th annual contest to find great writers in our community has begun at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
The Writers Competition is for fiction and nonfiction prose – no poetry please – up to 2,000 words. Entry forms, rules and a guide to creating an entry are available by visiting the library, by e-mail request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., by download at /cdalibrary.org/writers/, or by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Writers Competition, Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave., Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814-4012.
The deadline for entries is Friday, March 31. Each competitor may submit up to two entries in whatever combination of fiction and/or nonfiction they choose.
Entries will be judged in age groups 6-8, 9-11, 12-14, 15-18, and 19-plus by professional writers, editors, and educators. Winning entries will receive cash awards in each category and age group, $100 for first, $50 for second, and $25 for third. Professionally bound volumes containing all entries in the competition will be placed in the library collection.
The Writers Competition has previously been funded by the Hecla Mining Co., the Coeur d’Alene Kiwanis Club, and the Panhandle Kiwanis Club with additional support provided by Friends of the Library.
Winners will be notified by phone and e-mail and will be announced publicly at the Awards Ceremony on Saturday, May 20, at 1 p.m. in the library Community Room.
Information: David Townsend, communications coordinator, 208-769-2315 Ext. 426 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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